Printfriendly

Sunday, February 14, 2016

Okara patties



Okara patties

Okara!  What in the world is it, and why am I making patties out of it?  
Well, lets start with the fact that I have started making my own soy milk.  I don't use it often, so I thought it would be a good idea to start buying the dry beans, and making small batches of milk.  That way I don't waste all the soy milk when I buy it in a big box.  
When you make the soy milk from scratch, it has amazingly different flavor.  It has such a mild and creamy flavor.  
One of the results of soy milk, is the pulp left over.  This pulp is full of nutrition and flavor. It is called okara.  Here is the nutritional info on it. (for this I entered 1 cup, the amount for this recipe)

Ingredients:

1c okara
1c cooked rice (white or brown)
1c chopped mushrooms
3 stalks of green onion, sliced thin
1/2c rice flour (white or brown)
1 tsp. salt (optional)
2 tsp. garlic powder
2 tsp. onion powder
2 tablespoons sweet potato starch (or corn starch, or tapioca starch)
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/2c nutritional yeast
1/2c panko bread crumbs (make sure they are oil free)
1-2 tablespoons water if needed

Optional sauce:
1/4c low sodium soy sauce
1/4c maple syrup
2 tablespoons mirin
(instructions at the end)

Combine all the above in a large bowl (except the water) and mix well (squish and mix) until it well combined.
You want the consistency to be like a well mixed meatloaf.  If it is dry, add the water, one tablespoon at a time.  You want to be able to form nice patties that are moist.
I was able to get 9 patties, they were about 3 inches around.
In a large, nonstick saute pan over medium high heat, dry fry the patties.  You want to "fry" for at least 4-5 minutes per side, or until nice and golden brown.
You can remove at this point and serve on a bun, or you can take it one step further.  With the patties in the hot pan, pour the sauce recipe above in.  Move the patties around well.  Turning and flipping to make sure all the sides are covered.  This will add a wonderful, umami taste.  Remove from the pan and serve.  These will keep for a couple days in the fridge and can be warmed up.
I hope you can give this one a try, with a less used ingredient.


2 comments:

  1. Thanks for posting an okara recipe. I am hoping more will start making their own soy milk as the savings are tremendous without a lot of effort. I use a soymilk machine which we figured out paid for itself pretty quickly. I make about 2 batches a week for the milk (and okara) plus another batch for yogurt. So far the only uses we have for the okara are granola and I use it in my sourdough whole wheat bread recipe. I found it had an aquafaba type effect on the bread, softening it up. There are also recipes in some of the pantry vegan books, but I haven't tried them yet. I was hoping there was an okara Facebook group, but I haven't heard of one (yet!). Great stuff from the humble soybean.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for posting an okara recipe. I am hoping more will start making their own soy milk as the savings are tremendous without a lot of effort. I use a soymilk machine which we figured out paid for itself pretty quickly. I make about 2 batches a week for the milk (and okara) plus another batch for yogurt. So far the only uses we have for the okara are granola and I use it in my sourdough whole wheat bread recipe. I found it had an aquafaba type effect on the bread, softening it up. There are also recipes in some of the pantry vegan books, but I haven't tried them yet. I was hoping there was an okara Facebook group, but I haven't heard of one (yet!). Great stuff from the humble soybean.

    ReplyDelete